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If Our Presidents Can Take Time To Play Golf, So Can You! Here’s Some Presidential Golf Statistics.

We’re keeping it fun with some presidential golf facts!

  • Donald Trump
    Has won 19 club championships. Handicap Index reported to be 2.8
  • John F. Kennedy
    Despite chronic back pain, averaged 80.
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower
    Installed a green outside the Oval Office; member at Augusta National. Became friends with Arnold Palmer.
  • Gerald R. Ford
    Despite a clumsy image, a legitimate 80s-shooter. He also played with Arnold Palmer.
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt
    At 39, polio robbed him of a powerful golf swing
  • George W. Bush
    His handicap reported to dip under 10, post-presidency. He gave up golf during his presidency at the start of the Iraq War.
  • George H.W. Bush
    Once got his handicap down to 11. Favorite exclamation on the course was “Power outage!” when putts fell short
  • Bill Clinton
    Can break 90, especially using his “Billigans”
  • Barack Obama
    The lefty plays hoops and golf, more than 330 rounds during his two terms.
  • Ronald Reagan
    Didn’t play often or well (best was low 90s)
  • Warren G. Harding
    Struggled to break 95
  • Woodrow Wilson
    Played over 1,000 Rounds in office but almost never broke 100. He even enlisted his Secret Service agents to paint his golf balls black so that he could practice in the snow.
  • Richard M. Nixon
    He shot 79 once and quit the game
  • Lyndon B. Johnson
    Played with senators to secure votes for the Civil Rights Act of 1964
  • Calvin Coolidge
    When he vacated the White House, he left his clubs behind

Sources: Golf Digest, Cheat Sheet

How A Doorframe Can Help Your Golf Swing

By Keely Levins

Learn how to turn back, not sway.

Let’s talk about hip turn. James Kinney, one of our Golf Digest Best Young Teachers and Director of Instruction at GolfTec Omaha, says that from the data GolfTec has collected, they’ve found lower handicap golfers have a more centered lower body at the top of the swing. Meaning, they don’t sway.

If you’re swaying off the ball, you’re moving yourself off of your starting position. The low point of your swing moves back when you sway back, so you’re going to have to shift forward to get your club to bottom out where the ball is. That takes a lot of timing, and is going to end up producing some ugly shots.

So, instead, Kinney says you should turn.

“When turning your hips, you are able to stay more centered over the golf ball in your backswing and the low point of your swing stays in the proper position, resulting in consistent contact.”

To practice turning, Kinney says to set up in a doorway. Have your back foot against the doorframe. When you make your lower body move back, your hip will hit the door fame if you’re swaying. If you’re turning, your hips are safe from hitting the frame.

Remember that feeling of turning when you’re on the course and your ball striking is going to get a whole lot more consistent.

Source: Golf Digest

Rules Guy: Can I Adjust Poorly Placed Tee Markers Before A Tournament Begins?

The Rules of Golf are tricky! Thankfully, we’ve got the guru. Our Rules Guy knows the book front to back. Got a question? He’s got all the answers.

On a short par 3 over water, the tee box was placed with an overhanging tree on the line to the pin. I moved the left tee marker a few feet so that the tee shot could be hit without obstruction. This was done before everyone teed off — in fact, my opponent played first and I hit second. What is the correct penalty? This has sparked a huge debate in my men’s league. —JASON WRIGHT, VIA E-MAIL

If you notice that tee markers are poorly placed, are you allowed to adjust their position before play begins? Our expert has the answer.
Jason, the fact that you ask what the penalty is — rather than if there’s a penalty — suggests you know you’ve done wrong … and you have. (Admitting that you have a problem, however, is the first step toward recovery of your honor.)

Tee markers are fixed — yes, even poorly positioned ones. Under Rule 8.1a, if you move one to gain a potential advantage by improving the conditions affecting the stroke, you must take the general penalty, which is two strokes in stroke play or loss of hole in match play. (Other players could likewise be subject to penalty if they knowingly took advantage of your maneuver.)

Source: Golf.com

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